Subscribe to our newsletter below:

Your First name:
Your Email:

Unsubscribe

 

Untitled Document

Health-E-News July 2015
empowering you to optimal health

Do you suffer from Text Neck

The daily use of cell phones, tablets and other devices is resulting in an alarming increase in pain, discomfort, and headaches for teenagers. This new syndrome is known as 'Text Neck' and is affecting thousands. The good news is that Chiropractic can help.

If you are suffering with 'Text Neck', call us first, then put the phone down and go for a walk.

Are your kids getting enough water?

With summer here it's important to ensure your children (and you) are drinking lots of water.

More than half of children and teenagers in the United States might not be properly hydrated, according to a nationwide study from the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. In fact, 54.5% of the students in the study had urine concentrations that qualified them as below their minimum daily water intake.

"I was surprised that almost one in four kids drank no water during the course of their day," said lead author Erica Kenney, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Harvard Chan School.

Not all children and adolescents were equally dehydrated, according to the study. Boys surveyed were 76% more likely to be inadequately hydrated than girls, which was a statistically significant finding.

While mild dehydration typically isn't life threatening, not drinking enough water could result in cognitive impairment, headaches and even nausea in severe cases, according to Dr. Anisha Patel, a pediatrician at the University of California, San Francisco.

For younger children, symptoms include fussiness, infrequent urination, dry mouth and a lack of tears when the child is crying. "Keeping kids hydrated can help them with learning and to perform better in school," said Patel.

But how much water is enough? For kids and teenagers, daily water requirements vary quite a bit and depend on several factors, including age and activity level.

For total water intake, experts recommend that kids get the majority from drinking water, but also a small amount from food. Kids 1 to 3 years old need roughly four cups of drinking water daily. For kids 4 to 8, five cups is recommended a day. Once kids reach 9, the requirements differ by sex. For boys 9 to 13, eight cups of water is recommended daily, while girls need about seven cups.

"Children don't have a highly developed thirst mechanism, so they're especially vulnerable to becoming dehydrated," said Dianne Ward, a professor of nutrition in the UNC Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health and director of the Intervention and Policy Division. "So parents need to remind their children to drink water," Ward says.

All experts agreed that kids should steer clear of caffeinated and sugary beverages because these drinks contain other ingredients that don't necessarily provide nutritional benefits. Even worse, beverages with caffeine are mildly diuretic, meaning they cause the body to produce more urine. This means that caffeine could even make dehydration worse.

The experts we spoke to all had one resounding message: schools need to do a better job of providing kids access to clean drinking water, and not just during lunch time.

At home, parents can start by setting by a good example: drinking primarily plain water to create a "culture of hydration," said Ward. "Children shouldn't even have to ask for water," and younger children in child care should have clean drinking water available to them at all times.

Full Article

 

Chiropractic care is helping vets cope with pain

For years, the military has worried that an over-reliance on prescription painkillers was putting both veterans and active-duty troops at risk of addiction, serious adverse reactions to the drugs, and accidental death.

The problem was found to be greatest among veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan - particularly those with post-traumatic stress disorder - who, according to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, may have been given "inappropriate prescriptions" for opioids in a misguided attempt to quickly relieve their suffering.

Change appears to be coming as the military expands its use of treatments like Chiropractic care. In fact, Dr. Robert D. Kerns, the national program director for pain management at the Department of Veterans Affairs, told the New York Times that the study "encourages" his department as well as the Pentagon's health system, "to build on our existing initiatives."

As more research pours in, Chiropractic care continues to gain supporters. A 2013 study published in the journal "Spine," for example, found that 73 percent of participating active-duty military patients with acute low back pain receiving a combination of chiropractic treatment and standard medical care rated their global improvement as "pain completely gone," "much better" or "moderately better."

Just 17 percent in the same study who received only standard care said likewise.

Original Study

 


Copyright © Chirowebs.net All Rights Reserved.
Web site designed and hosted by Chirowebs.net

Do not attempt self-diagnosis or self-treatment based on our 
reports. Please consult your Chiropractor if you are 
interested in following up on the information presented.