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Health-E-News January 2015
empowering you to optimal health.

Happy New Year!

Ready to make 2015 the best year ever? We are excited to be partnering with you to make 2015 your healthiest yet!

Chiropractic helps a 6 year old who suffered with headaches for 2 years.

A recent study described how a 6 year old boy benefited from Chiropractic care after suffering from headaches for 2 years. He sought Chiropractic care after receiving only minor relief from Ibuprofen.

Headaches are surprisingly common in childhood and increases in frequency as children enter their teenage years. 37% to 51% in children younger than 7 years of age suffer from headaches, and the number of those suffering from headaches increases to 57% to 82% by age 15 years. Prior to puberty, boys are affected more frequently than girls, but following the onset of puberty, headaches occur more frequently in girls.

This 6 year old boy began a series of gentle, Chiropractic care over a 2 month period. Happily, after receiving 10 visits over 2 months, the child experienced a complete eliminations of all headaches.

Original Study

Why let children suffer? If your child suffers from headaches, call and set up an appointment for them.

 

The New Year, even starting small helps

Even a 5-minute run can help prevent heart disease

Good news for runners: A new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology suggests running, even for a few minutes a day, can reduce your risk of dying from heart disease - whether you plod along or go at race speed.

Researchers studied more than 55,000 adults between the ages of 18 and 100 over a 15-year period, looking at their overall health, whether they ran and how long they lived.

The speed and frequency of a person's running routine did not make a huge difference either. The data showed novice runners who ran less than 51 minutes, fewer than 6 miles, slower than 6 miles per hour, or only one or two times per week still had a lower risk of dying than those who did not put on running shoes.

However, researchers did discover that consistency was key. They found participants who ran consistently over a period of six years or more gained the most benefits, with a 29% lower risk of death for any reason and 50% lower risk of death from heart disease or stroke.

Activities like running can lower your blood pressure and decrease the production of glucose, which cuts your risk of developing diabetes, according to the American Heart Association. Running also seems to protect the innermost lining of the arteries, keeping the walls and cells intact, which cuts the risk of blockages or clots that can cause strokes or heart attacks.

Full Report

 

Ready to start the new year?

January is a great time to start resolutions and here are some tips to help. If you relapse, don't beat yourself up. Simply start the next day, refocused. Remember health is a journey, not a destination.

Here are those tips:

Get some exercise

It can take a lot of physical activity to burn off one moment of weakness - you'd have to run almost 5 miles to cancel out the calories in a Dunkin' Donuts Apple Crumb donut, for example. But even if you can't entirely negate your dietary indiscretions, a little extra cardio is still better than nothing.

"What’s even more important than burning off those calories is that exercise can reduce your appetite and reduce your cravings for additional sugar. Going for a quick walk, adding an extra 15 minutes to your regular afternoon workout, or taking the stairs at lunchtime instead of the elevator, will all help to make a healthy 2015.

Cut carbs at your next meal

This strategy will not only help keep your overall daily calories in check, she says, but it can help keep your blood-sugar levels stable so you’ll stay energized throughout the day.

Drink a glass (or two) of water

You may be tempted to guzzle coffee once you start to feel the effects of your sugar crash, but the buzz you get from caffeine will be short-lived. Instead, stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water.

Have a high-protein snack

No matter how many calories you ingest during a junk-food binge, chances are you'll feel hungry again about two hours later. If you're not due for a meal, satisfy your appetite with a 100- to 200-calorie, high-protein snack. Have an apple with peanut butter, a hard-boiled egg, some Greek yogurt-something that's low in simple sugars that will help you feel full until your next meal.

Stay on your feet

Resist the urge to slump in your chair all afternoon; instead, try to spend as much time standing up as possible. In a 2011 study published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, showed the majority of people who used a standing desk at work for seven weeks reported that they felt more energized, more focused, and more productive.

Plus, standing will automatically burn off more of those calories than sitting, and a recent Australian study shows that alternating bouts of sitting and standing throughout the day can help lower elevated blood sugar levels, as well.

Full Report

 

Go For A Walk To Reduce Your Alzheimer’s Risk

No matter how you spin it, the news that exercise may help prevent and treat Disease X doesn't really qualify as a surprise. That’s the default assumption these days.

But when Disease X is Alzheimer’s, a progressive and irreversible degenerative brain condition with few effective treatment options, the finding is worth a closer look. Drawing on data from more than 150,000 participants in the National Runners’ and Walkers’ Health Studies over a 17-year period, a new U.S. study shows that regular exercise lowers the risk of dying from Alzheimer’s by as much as 40 per cent.

The results also showed that running and walking are equally effective as long as you burn the same amount of energy overall. That means you need to spend about twice as much time (or cover 50 per cent more distance) walking briskly compared to running, Williams says.

That doesn't mean that lesser amounts of exercise are useless, cautions Dr. Jordan Antflick of the Ontario Brain Institute, who co-ordinated a 2013 report on the role of exercise in Alzheimer’s prevention and treatment.

"You don’t have to run a marathon," he says. "Even raking the leaves or going for a walk after dinner can help."

The precise mechanisms through which exercise fights Alzheimer's remain unclear, but Antflick points to several possible contributors. Exercise boosts cardiovascular health through mechanisms like improved blood flow to the brain - "so if your heart is healthy, your brain is healthy," he says. Exercise also boosts levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which stimulates the growth of new neurons and their integration into the network of existing neurons.

Full Report

 

 

 

 


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